time to go . . .

ByeFor me, a woman who has the kid from the country she once was still in her psyche; the experience of living and working in and around Sydney for the past 25 years has been pretty cool. Little did I dream as I played childhood games of ‘let’s pretend’ at an invisible typewriter I’d end up resident of an inner city locality I had no idea existed, doing a job involving computers and technologies not then thought of, employed by one of the world’s largest law firms, spending my week days in a skyscraper looking out over Sydney Harbour.

Of all the locations I’ve lived in as an adult, inner-city Sydney is where I’ve felt most at home. For almost 12 years I’ve wandered its streets, commuted by train to Circular Quay, strolled through the CBD knowing it wasn’t going to be forever but enjoying the pit-stop on my journey. We’re leaving the city at its best; in the warmer weather it sparkles and glows ready for the festive season.Way Out

Sydney has been good to me… but currently reading Silent Spring (1962) by Rachel Carson, a quote by ecologist Paul Shepard she includes in chapter 2 The Obligation to Endure leaps out…

“idealizes life with only its head out of water, inches above the limits of toleration of the corruption of its own environment… Why should we tolerate a diet of weak poisons, a home in insipid surroundings, a circle of acquaintances who are not quite our enemies, the noise of motors with just enough relief to prevent insanity? Who would want to live in a world which is just not quite fatal?”

It’s time for us say our farewells… for, in the words of Kahlil Gibran “life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.”

A day in the life…


35 thoughts on “time to go . . .

  1. Your motives so closely echo mine of 11 years ago, when I decided to leave London, leave the UK and emigrate to Australia. I had lived and worked in London for 20 years, and it had morphed from a sparkling city fully of interest, excitement and possibility into a grim, crowded, dangerous, dirty and depressing place that was slowly making me sick, tired and desperate. I have never regretted making my change for the better, and I’m willing to bet you never will either! I’m looking forward, too, to being able to see you when we next visit Coffs, rather than hoping the planets will align and you just might be around when we are!

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    1. I’m so fortunate to be in the good company of happy, successful people who have made the leap before me. I’ve been truly privileged to have experienced living in such a beautiful city but just as I needed to leave the country to have those opportunities, I need to move on to find different ones. It’s great that we have the Coffs Coast as a connection but the G.O. and I will do that trip to north Queensland yet.

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  2. As ever, you bring back so many emotions for me. Living and working in Sydney, in an inner city suburb, Circular Quay, and, the decision to quit a life. You know how much I empathise so I’ll say no more. Just, when one door closes, another one opens, something said to us in Sydney. In this case, you are in charge of the doors. May the door you are opening bring you much happiness.

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    1. Sydney will have changed and stayed them same, as all places do. I’m sure many of the sights remain familiar to you, and the memories multi-dimensional of the lifestyle & seasons. I’m grateful I’ve had them too, and that I’m the space now to walk through the door, although I’m not sure I’m in charge… just happen to know it’s the right time.

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  3. The Daughter and I only moved half way – to the fringe of Melbourne instead of to the ‘real’ country – but we’ve both enjoyed the benefits, clean air being one of them. Bon voyage as you finally go home. 🙂

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    1. The fringes of the city are very attractive places… the best of both worlds but in Sydney, and other cities the boundaries are creeping and outer areas becoming hubs in themselves. For us it’s not so much the geography but apartment living work-centric lifestyle. With it, we can afford to live in and around Sydney, but the country offers us a better lifestyle for less.

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  4. I can really relate Dale. When I go back and visit the area in the US where I grew up it seems like it is in a state of ‘not quite fatal’. Alice Springs has its problems, to be sure, but it doesn’t feel like we are just ‘head above water’ here either. But this life is way beyond anything I ever dreamed of. I don’t know if we will stay in Alice forever, but I’ve yet to find anything to lure me away. Enjoyed seeing ‘a day in the life’ of yourself. You and the GO have really worked toward your goal, now I hope you enjoy it. xx

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    1. Thank you 🙂 It would be a wonder if you grew up in Ohio wondering if you’d end up in outback Australia! I love my glimpses of Alice from the Imparja Television channel we get at TA courtesy of the satellite dish, and your photos. The regional advertising intrigues and seduces, so it will be interesting to visit and see it for real.

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  5. I was brought up in a small village in Germany and now I live on the pacific coast in. small town . Big cities are fun but I belong in the country.
    Best of luck with your move and your new live !

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  6. It’s great that you’ll have fond memories of working and living in the city but with things like your burglary and the increase in noise pollution it will be great for you to get back to T.A. and a calmer pace of life. If it also gives you the chance to fulfill a dream of seeing Australia from your caravan then more power to you.
    I wish you and the G.O. all the luck in the world Dale and the happiness too.
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

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  7. When I left the big smoke and moved to the RUC it was the best move I’d made in a long time. The only thing I missed was the huge pay packet, but this teaches you to live within your means (and it’s amazing how little money you really need when you’re in a rural area – the city is expensive). I never imagined I’d land a pretty good job writing content for government websites that I can do in my pajamas on the writer’s nook 😀 It’s amazing how life changes 😉

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    1. I used exactly that story as a [good] example [not a dire warning] the other day when chatting to the G.O. about possibilities. Like going on a trip, one can make plans and itineraries but only once you get there can you take in the lay of the land and make the most of it. We have leapt before, you just need to be prepared to back yourself, not just with a financial plan which is important but in your attitudes and belief you can.

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    1. Thank you. I have ordered the packing boxes and we’ll have 3 days to pack up a small apartment after we finish work. No room to do much beforehand. Only 4 weeks of work left less a long weekend at TA 🙂

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  8. The city has been good to you methinks! I had a love affair with the city In my three years there as well…I loved it all the way up until the day I no longer did. That was a great quote from Rachel Carson – indeed, why should we put up with a life like that?

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    1. I’m happy that the city and I are parting as friends, and it will be here for visits in the future. Everything has pros and cons; the city and that life supported a necessary part of our plan and we mitigated ‘the obligation to endure’ as best we could. But we knew we wanted something different long-term 🙂

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  9. I love this Dee. And thank you for quoting from Silent Spring and reminding me I need and want to read it. I know (hope) you’ll keep in touch with us and I anticipate ever more thought provoking words amid the stories as you settle in at Taylors Arm. x.

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    1. Thank you. I’m finding Silent Spring interesting, incredible and hard going… I have to return my library copy before we leave but I’ll source my own copy and continue reading bits at a time.
      I’m working through… sigh… internet provider options but will still have mobile broadband that works pretty much everywhere except TA, so will be in touch regardless… although I hope to avoid having to cart laptop everywhere I go.

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  10. Before I left NYC, I took pictures of all the parts of my daily life because once I relocated I knew it might start to fade. Little things like my apartment building lobby. My favorite tree in the park. My subway stop.

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