sage

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Letters for my Little Sister by Cecilia M. Buyswheeler Gunther & The Fellowship

Sage… is how I would describe the wise, warm words of the contributions comprising the recently published anthology Letters for my Little Sister by Cecilia M. Buyswheeler Gunther & The Fellowship “a book of letters written by sixty-eight women about their experiences with Menopause. Yes! The forbidden M word.” You can purchase it in glorious hardcopy via Amazon.

There’s another M word: Motherless. There are certain lonely times when you are motherless. No matter the good intentions they’re shoes nigh impossible for someone or something else to fill… when I recently married although we eloped with no guests, wanting some accompanying presence I wore my mother’s watch, her mother’s brooch and donned a wedding ring made from both their bands.

People mean well. In my mid 30’s, my father’s youngest and only sister (whose own mother – my beloved Nanna – died more than a quarter century before) having entered that stage in her life handed on to me with only the words “you might need this” an unprepossessing Coping with Menopause booklet. Several years later with polite thanks to my aunt I returned it unopened.

We first heard of Letters for my Little Sister when Celi aka Miss C of The Kitchens Garden (who is Cecilia M. Buyswheeler Gunther) wrote “my mother died when I was a young Mum…” and about “Change of Life. The Big Secret. The Witching time. The aging. The Menopause” asked of The Fellowship “But what am I to tell my little sister? What shall I tell her? How shall I draw the pathway that she will follow. I am the oldest. I want to write a letter for my sisters“. It seems many of The Fellowship are similarly motherless but not necessarily. However, it’s this that made a difference to me; a group I felt I belonged and could make a contribution to.

Sage… as in the plant that has “one of the longest histories of use of any culinary or medicinal herb”, on that same subject; menopause, is what I’ve had success using to halt hot flashes which began not long after I sent to Celi my own Letters for my Little Sister essay about my journey through peri-menopause.

After reviewing the plethora of remedies offered both online and in pharmacy, being astonished at the cost of proprietary products & the multiplicity of natural remedies, sage struck me as easy and available. Not having regular access to garden and sage plant to make a fresh infusion I thought I would begin the trial simply & cheaply, so purchased from the supermarket for a couple of dollars a packet of dried sage as you would use for cooking. There are contraindications and precautions to the use of sage which I heeded, proceeding cautiously. For my morning cups of tea several times a week I steep a pinch of the dried herb with boiled water in a small teapot, drink half and refill. Within a month the hot flashes disappeared and haven’t returned.

The following links provide information and precautions regarding the use of sage:

Can Sage Help Night Sweats?

Sage Benefits

Sage Risks

Important Disclaimer

The writer is conveying information from her own experience and is not a health care professional.

The information contained in this topic is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, it is provided for informational purposes only. You assume full responsibility for how you choose to use this information. Always seek the advice of a  health care professional before starting any new treatment or discontinuing an existing treatment. Talk with a health care professional about any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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27 thoughts on “sage

    davidprosser said:
    September 30, 2014 at 8:22 pm

    Sage advice there.People forget that you can be an orphan no matter your age so when the need for special advice is felt, the choices are limited.
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 1, 2014 at 5:23 am

      Thank you. Although Dad is a font of wisdom and amusement, I think he’d agree menopause is not an area of his expertise, if it was gardening or fixing my car, I’d be alright.

      Like

    ardysez said:
    October 1, 2014 at 6:09 am

    What a very interesting weaving together of several threads, EllaDee. I have ordered my copy but have not had a chance to read it as it is awaiting me on our trip to the USA in a few weeks! As I wrote in my own contribution to Celi’s book, even if your Mother is living and you have close contact with her, Menopause is a very individual thing, in my experience. It is a time of self discovery at many levels. I wish I’d had some sage advice, though, as in advice about taking sage!! 🙂

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 1, 2014 at 7:36 am

      Life is a journey, as They say; friends and sage advice however encountered is welcome. Sarah Ban Breathnach’s Simple Abundance is also on my bookshelf. What we encounter on our journey and how we deal with it is how we become who we really are. Google and the internet may have their detractors/downside but for making helpful information widely available, although there is much to sift through on the subject of menopause, and bringing diverse people together it can’t be beaten.

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    Francesca said:
    October 1, 2014 at 8:05 am

    Wise thoughts too, Ella. I have noticed that the Greek community uses sage in tea: I wonder if this is connected and that these wise women also know the benefits durung menapause. I must pass this onto my daughter: she won’t mind gettin good advice before its due, especially if I offer it AND a glass of white wine at the same time.
    My granddaughter came up the other day and told me that sage is very handy for cleaning teeth- it’s funny when ‘sage’ thoughts come full circle and the little ones tell you what you told their mother.
    That first photo, looking out at the bridge, is rather gorgeous.

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 1, 2014 at 9:43 am

      Thank you. I was amazed to read the many benefits of sage, and Letters for my Little Sister has already solved a few mysteries for me. How wonderful your granddaughter provided tangible evidence of your ‘sage’ wisdom being handed on 🙂

      Like

    Kourtney Heintz said:
    October 1, 2014 at 10:17 am

    It’s amazing what home remedies are out there that if used properly can be really helpful. I swear by Apple Cider vinegar for breaking up coughs and helping with respiratory problems. 🙂

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 1, 2014 at 10:31 am

      I love herbal home remedies, and we have Apple Cider vinegar in the cupboard for stomach settling and detox. Should we succumb to a lurgy I will reapply your suggestion 🙂

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        Kourtney Heintz said:
        October 15, 2014 at 7:39 am

        My grandmother swears by them. It’s amazing what simple cures there are available. It is a great stomach settler too. 🙂

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    Eha said:
    October 1, 2014 at 12:34 pm

    With hindsight I almost feel guilty at having written ‘my little bit’ in about a quarter hour with a hugest smile on my face since mine, way back, was such a greatly fun time!! Medically trained and having ‘advised’ so many in my lifetime I should have taken this as a ‘task’ to be somewhat more serious, even if I was 100% honest – yup, I had HUGE fun during mine, never mind the symptomatology!! So read and try to understand!!!!!

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 1, 2014 at 1:43 pm

      Your contribution to Letters for my Little Sister is wonderful. Reminding us that anything is possible and to be open to it. As Ardys mentioned, Menopause is a very individual thing, and any of the wisdom in the letters might be applicable to someone somewhere somehow 🙂

      Like

    acflory said:
    October 1, 2014 at 8:02 pm

    Damn, I wish someone had told me this ten years ago! Well done ladies.

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 3, 2014 at 10:06 am

      Thank you. Have a look on Celi’s blog, she is compiling a registrations for contributions to a new anthology – Letters for my Baby Girl.

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        acflory said:
        October 3, 2014 at 7:51 pm

        I’ll check it out. 🙂

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    Lori D said:
    October 1, 2014 at 11:24 pm

    Peri-menopause was awful. I had the big ‘H’ surgery a couple of years ago. Right now I’m on hormone replacement, and it’s the most natural form you can get. I may need to go off of it in a couple of years though. Sigh. Thanks for sharing that info, and I’m so glad it has worked for you.

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 3, 2014 at 10:08 am

      Thank you. I thnk the more information shared and the more available it is, the less we feel alone in our experiences. My own journey through the Big M will now be far less isolated than I anticipated.

      Liked by 1 person

    safia said:
    October 2, 2014 at 4:04 am

    Very interesting and informative with regard to the hot flushes. Haven’t experienced menopause yet, but my older sister started hers about a year ago and is still hot all the time. So, in this case the sage advice will be passed on by a little sister to a bigger one. 🙂 BTW, my mum is still with us and is very little help to my sister, having managed to forget what the menopause was like, insisting it doesn’t last long! My sister begs to differ.

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 3, 2014 at 10:14 am

      I like that sage advice from the younger sister 🙂 I’m sure if I asked around the older females in my extended family about their experiences with menopause, I would get varied answers, some in-depth, and others like your Mum would have moved on from it, and erased the details.

      Liked by 1 person

    diannegray said:
    October 2, 2014 at 1:18 pm

    I’m certainly trying a little sage in my tea. I had menopause for ten years, it went away last year and now it appears to have returned! Noooooo 😦 I’m also going to get my hands on the anthology as well 😉

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 3, 2014 at 10:21 am

      I’m sipping sage tea in the hope of sustaining the no-hot-flashes-magic. How awful for the menopause symptoms to come back… a most unwelcome return visitor. I love that the contributions in the book are from real people, many of whom I encounter daily in the comments on The Kitchens Garden blog 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    philosophermouseofthehedge said:
    October 7, 2014 at 9:38 am

    This is such a lovely post (we all become orphans eventually – some even earlier as family members age and leave before they leave).
    I’ve always loved the word “sage”. It’s sound. It’s meanings. It’s color. Somehow all of that fuses into a powerful word. Doesn’t surprise me that the plant holds powers, too.
    (Can’t wait for my book to arrive)

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 8, 2014 at 6:26 am

      Thank you 🙂 Sage advice of this kind is out of Dad’s jurisdiction but he’s helpful with sage gardening advice. The word sage is crisp and strong but not intimidating… trustworthy. The Sydney apartment we rent from my sister has shades of sage colour accents. She & I picked it out together not realizing I’d be the one living here!

      Liked by 1 person

        philosophermouseofthehedge said:
        October 8, 2014 at 7:48 am

        Sometimes life picks us? Sage might be a nice name for a child, but maybe too demanding/difficult to live up to. Now a dog or cat – they’d handle it with ease
        Sage is popular Thanksgiving spice for turkey. Seems appropriate

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    Gerlinde said:
    October 7, 2014 at 3:41 pm

    I just got my Letters For My Little Sister book and I love the different stories. Sage is often used as a cleansing herb by the native Americans.

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 8, 2014 at 6:31 am

      I’ve been carrying my copy around in it’s postal envelope to protect the preciousness… I love what I’ve read so far, real experiences and thoughts 🙂 I’ve done sage smudges and clearings, and used it in cooking. I’m enjoying the tea for the taste as well, clean & warm-earthy.

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    everythingelse21 said:
    October 16, 2014 at 1:28 am

    One time I went into this spiritual bookstore, and the lady working there was walking around with a bundle of burning sage. She was waving it everywhere and jabbing it up into corners. The owner came out and asked her what the hell she was doing. She said that a customer had called and said that she had recently visited the store, and she thought that she had picked up an evil spirit in there in the store – it had followed her home. So the worker was ‘disinfecting’ the store – with burning sage.

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      EllaDee responded:
      October 16, 2014 at 5:52 am

      Thank you, what an interesting anecdote 🙂 I have sage smudged rooms similarly, to clear the energy and have been smudged myself as part of “wild woman” classes! It helps that it is a nice “campfire” smell.

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